Assorted Links (6/5/2010)

Here’s a list of articles that I have been reading lately:

 
www.american.com
“Robert Reich and others think the latest crop of America’s entrepreneurs is teeming with the out-of-work and desperate. We’re not so sure.”
 
blogs.wsj.com
“Reports from Google and from Super Bowl host cities’ bid committees that they provide big economic boosts appear to be overstated.”
 
online.wsj.com
“In The Wall Street Journal, American Enterprise Institute President Arthur Brooks says the Obama agenda will make America look more like Greece, and turn tea partiers into the kind of public sector workers who strike and riot in Athens for higher pay.”
 
online.wsj.com
“The Wall Street Journal writes on the May jobs report and notes that most of the jobs added were from temporary census workers.”
 
freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com
“Fred Shapiro traces the origins of popular quotes.”
 
online.wsj.com
“Why the film industry is so good at getting business wrong.”
 
motherjones.com
“Does “The Shack” offer answers to Christianity’s most vexing question?”
 
www.american.com
“Paul Krugman is right: America isn’t Greece. That doesn’t mean we aren’t in worrisome shape. And by one measure, we are in worse shape than Greece.”
 
online.wsj.com
“John Horgan reviews Nicholas Carr’s The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains.”
 
online.wsj.com
“Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels writing in The Wall Street Journal on how creditors in his state took on the federal government in the Supreme Court and helped restored the rule of law after last year’s Chrysler bailout.”
 
online.wsj.com
“In The Wall Street Journal, Potomac Watch columnist Kimberley Strassel wonders if the White House dealings with Joe Sestak and Andrew Romanoff violates the Hatch Act.”
 

www.theatlantic.com

“One thing about taxes that most people don’t find intuitive is that the higher they are, the harder…”
 
online.wsj.com
“Burton G. Malkiel writes in The Wall Street Journal that putting Social Security on a sustainable path isn’t nearly enough to end our entitlement shortfall. But it would do a lot to convince markets that Washington can be serious.”
 
online.wsj.com
“Daniel Henninger writes in The Wall Street Journal that preferring to be blowhards than statesmen, the world’s powers find it easier to denounce small nations like Israel than take on large and difficult problems like Iran or North Korea.”
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